Parks Department Repairs Fence

fence2After many months of cajoling, last weekend the Seattle Parks Department finally repaired the fence alongside Victory Heights Park that was damaged last year.

Previous: Parks Dept Says They’ll Need SDOT Help To Fix Fence

The news was announced at last night’s outdoor meeting of the Victory Heights Community Council that was held by the picnic tables not too far from the newly repaired fence.

Read the complete minutes from last night’s meeting.

The guest speaker this month was Debbie Goetz from the city’s Office of Emergency Management who spoke about SNAP and the neighborhood HUBs that have been organized in case of an emergency. Attendees received a number of informative flyers as well as two cool gadgets: a keychain whistle, and a miniature wind-up light.

Next month’s meeting (on July 21st, also in the park) will be the planning session for the Neighborhood Night Out on August 4th. We need as many people as possible to attend so we can hand out packets of flyers that will be distributed to every house in the neighborhood in late July. Please come and participate and help make this family event great for a third straight year.

Parks Dept Says They’ll Need SDOT Help To Fix Fence

parkfenceThe stretch of broken fence along the 19th Avenue NE side of Victory Heights Park will finally get some attention this summer via an alliance by two city departments. At last night’s meeting of the Victory Heights Community Council, newly elected President Victor Hernandez said he had spoken with Chris Johnson at Seattle Parks & Recreation. Johnson said he was aware of the issue of the fence (which has been that way since last November) but that Parks alone couldn’t “find time or budget” in order to get it fixed anytime before this autumn. But, teaming up with the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) to do the work, the hope is to have something by July.

Read the complete minutes of the April Community Council meeting.

Special bonus: Minutes of last month’s meeting.

Other highlights from last night’s meeting include a reminder of Saturday’s May Day basket making party (maybe next year if there’s interest we can put up a May Pole in the park as a fun family event), an April 29th “Community Conversation” in Lake City about the future of urban design there (see http://lakecityfuturefirst.org/ for details), and a District 5 city council candidates forum at Jane Addams school on May 18th.

Don’t forget the Lake City Farmer’s Market starts up again on June 11th. Building on last year’s success, it will feature revolving food trucks, wine tastings, beer, and musicians. And lots of fresh veggies too!

The next meeting of the Community Council will be Tuesday, May 19th, when the speaker will be Art Brochet, SDOT’s communications representative who will provide the latest updates on the Northgate Pedestrian and Bicycle Project. We hope to see you there!

“Temporary” Fencing Going In At Knickerbocker Site

fenceSeattle Public Utilities (SPU) began erecting “temporary” fencing around the Knickerbocker Thornton Creek site today in order to keep out “people and dogs” to allow the young vegetation a chance to grow. When construction was completed in October for the floodplain project and the construction fencing was removed it was assumed the site would remain open with clear sight lines to the newly restored creek. Alas, worries about foot traffic (both human and canine) around the sensitive new tree plantings on either side of the creek has altered plans, and new fencing will be erected around the entire site except for a gap to allow access to the pedestrian bridge. The fencing will probably remain through the winter and possibly be replaced by trees or some other type of wood barrier eventually.

UPDATE Dec. 10th: John Crawford-Gallagher, SPU’s Community Outreach Specialist, responds:

  1. The fencing will be around portions of the site, rather than the whole thing. There will be fence along NE 100th and a small section of fence on the south side of the creek.
  2. When we remove the fence will depend on how quickly the plants become established. It may be at the end of winter, but it may be longer.
  3. We don’t plan to replace the temporary fencing with trees or another type of wood barrier.